How to train for a thru hike

how to train for a thru hike

Training for Thru Hiking: Start Six Month Prior to Dominate

Dec 24, Training for a thru-hike. How to train for a thru-hike will depend on your normal level of activity. If youre a couch potato who has suddenly decided to tackle a thru-hike, plan for at least six months of walking, running, hiking Author: Berne Broudy. Jan 21, Prepare Your Body. Get Fit. There is no escaping the need for physical training, and Davis suggests beginning with a cardio routine and Add Weight. This simulates the pound pack youll be carrying on the trail. Davis suggests adding a weighted pack Practice the Uphill. For the Author: Alexandra Herman.

Our online Thru-Hiking class covers how to train for a thru hike you need to plan and finish the long-distance hike of your dreams. Start it instantly, complete it at your own pace, access it forever. Sign up now! I saw Wild this past week. Inshe set the current AT speed record with a time of 46 days, 11 hours, and 20 minutes. A good training regimen should prepare your body, your mind and your gear.

There is no escaping the need for physical training, and Davis suggests beginning with a cardio routine and weight lifting. For every what it has to offer day how to train for a thru hike strength trainingyou should complete two days of cardiogiving yourself one or two days off per week. The goal is to get your body moving and comfortable being active.

Davis suggests adding a weighted pack to your exercises two to three times per week. She often how to disable back button of browser in php her two-year-old daughter on walks or hikes and wears her pack in her living room to do step-ups with onto a low wooden box for 45 minutes while she watches TV. For the last step in a training routine, you must add elevation gain.

If you live in a mountainous area, get out and hike. Davis also suggests practicing yoga to strengthen your core. For Davis, mental and emotional training is even more important than the physical training. You can also tailor this information by looking for someone with a similar background and physical abilities to you. Many are happy to help mentor an aspiring hiker. Try to spend anywhere from a weekend to a week on your target trail. Doing at least one or two of these trips is important to help test and prepare your gear, test your physicality and strength, and put you in the correct mindset for thru-hiking.

Check the conditions of the trail you plan to thru-hike and read reviews from others as well. The latest gear, trips, stories, and more, beamed to your inbox every week. Backpacker Newsletter The latest gear, trips, stories, and more, beamed to your inbox every week.

Simple Workout for Hikers

The Appalachian Trail Conservancy reports that only one in four hikers make it to Mount Katahdin to complete a successful thru hike of the AT, listing injuries are among the most common reasons they quit. Taking time to prepare your body for your upcoming thru hike is an investment in your own success. Jan 09, Training your BODY for Thru-Hiking YOGA. Some say the key to not getting injured is building flexibility. Yoga has so many benefits that will help in BUILD CARDIO. Be comfortable being active! Remember you are going to be walking every single day for weeks or months STRENGTH TRAINING. The. How We Train for a Thru Hike Frequency of Training Hikes. We try to get out walking at least five times a week. When we are really in the groove, we Terrain for Training Hikes. Since our off-trail life is nomadic, we are often staying in different locations each year Longer Training Hikes.

Each year seems to find us in a different situation as we train for a big hike. Some years we have the luxury of training on hiking trails just minutes from our front door. Other years we have only paved roads nearby to walk on.

Some years we have several months before a hike to devote to physical preparation. Over time, we have developed our own set of training guidelines for a long hike which we strive to follow. We believe these guidelines will put us in the best physical shape for enjoying our long hikes. Your body can ache, you can feel constantly winded, your feet can hurt and a person may feel like giving up and getting off the trail.

Training for a hike can help to avoid those problems, or at least greatly minimize them as your body adapts to spending most of the day walking. So, here are some guiding principles for our pre-hike training:. We try to get out walking at least five times a week. When we are really in the groove, we may be able to get out every day, but our minimum is at least five days.

This helps to ensure that we can really get a lot of miles under our belts before even stepping foot on a big trail. Hiking a long trail has your legs working day after day, so getting them into the routine ahead of time is helpful. Making your hiking preparation part of your daily routine is probably one of the best ways to make sure it happens, rather than leaving it to big mile days on weekends. Since our off-trail life is nomadic, we are often staying in different locations each year as we prepare for the hiking season.

The climbs can help build our lung and muscular capacity as well as stamina over time. Eight miles on gently rolling roads becomes our substitute for four miles of steep hiking trails. A lot of our winters over the past five years have been spent in Mexico. One bonus of the town where we stay is the cobblestone streets. The uneven surface of the roads is great training for our ankles and helps to strengthen them. The point is to get used to walking on uneven ground since that is what most trails have.

When possible, we try to do one hike a week which is at least 10 miles. We find that these longer hikes help to prepare our feet for the increased use they will endure on the trail. Therefore, the more our feet get used to long distances, the less they hurt on the big trails. That means that you will be wearing the same clothes all-day every-day for weeks or months. You want to make sure that the clothes you are planning to hike in are actually comfortable and work with your pack.

Before doing our first long hike Appalachian Trail in , I would only wear tank tops when hikingshirts with sleeves never felt comfortable to me. However, once I got the pack I used on the trail a used Gossamer Gear Miniposa and tried it on a training hike, I knew immediately that a tank top was not going to work.

The shoulder straps on the pack had a section of velcro on the side to allow people to pull out the foam pad and stuff in socks or whatever , which really rubbed my neck. I knew that I needed to get a collared shirt in order to be able to hike comfortably with that pack. SHOES While training, it is highly recommended to wear the footwear that you will be using on the trail. This kind of seems obvious, but it still should not be overlooked.

During training, you are essentially testing out your shoes to make sure they work for you fit, comfort, etc.. After a pair of shoes wore out on the AZT in , Beardoh picked up a pair of Altra Olympus shoes a shoe brand that we had no experience with at that time.

These shoes simply did not work for him and the shoes rubbed the top of his feet raw. A benefit of walking with a pack is to help our bodies and our feet get used to the extra weight we will be carrying.

Additionally, we get a feel for our packs in case we decide any tweaks are needed. Training with the extra weight can also influence the gear choices we make. If a pack feels too heavy on a training walk, chances are that it will feel too heavy when on a long trail. We have been able to tailor our training to our circumstances each year, regardless of locale and situation.

We have trained in a variety of settings and never felt disadvantaged because of our location. Before starting the AT in , we were able to log over miles in the two months prior to starting. Our situation at the time allowed us to combine hiking some steep trails with a good amount of walking on dirt roads.

Instead of hiking trails in the mountains, our walking options were mostly rolling country roads, with a few ATV trails thrown in. In , as we were preparing for the AZT, we were able to take advantage of the fact that we were living in the perfect situation for physical preparation. We were living at 5, feet of elevation and could easily hike up steep trails to 8, feet.

We had the ideal situation of high elevation hiking on trails which were really challenging. The loose gravel on the steep trails was good experience for some of the difficult sections of the southern AZT.

Being used to living and hiking at elevation was really helpful as we started the hike and found ourselves climbing to around 9, feet on the first day. Should you have an overall mileage goal for your hiking? Probably, if it motivates you to get out on a regular basis. Regardless of the length of the thru hike we are preparing for, we try to follow the above guideline whenever we can be it for a short hike like the John Muir or Tahoe Rim Trails or for something much longer like the Appalachian or Pacific Crest Trails.

Generally, the beginning of a long hike is when the most aches and pains will present themselves. If you find logging the miles during your prep time monotonous or tedious, that may be an indication to how you will feel on a long distance thru hike.

Granted, the scenery will most likely be more spectacular and enjoyable than the places that many hikers train, but the core of the thru hiking experience is walking all day, which may not be for everyone. The whole point of training is to prepare your body for the challenge of hiking a big trail. Dealing with the pain of sore muscles, blistered feet, and and a generally unhappy body can take the joy out of hiking. For us, and presumably, for most hikers, the experience of being outdoors, living life at a walking pace, and enjoying the scenery of remote places is what pushes us to hike.

Being fit when we start a trail helps us to be able to focus on the things we love about hiking. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam.

Learn how your comment data is processed. Well over 13, miles of our thru hiking blogs, photos of our trips and resources can all be found on this site. We hope that the pages herein can be of help and inspiration. Some of the links within the pages Long Distance Hiker are affiliate links. We are discontinuing the addition of affiliate links to new pages as of February We encourage you to support the trail organizations that make hiking around the world a possibility.

Sign Up for our mailing list to get our newsletter with new posts. This is typically emailed times per month. Email Address powered by MailChimp! So, here are some guiding principles for our pre-hike training: Frequency of Training Hikes We try to get out walking at least five times a week.

Terrain for Training Hikes Since our off-trail life is nomadic, we are often staying in different locations each year as we prepare for the hiking season. Walking on uneven surfaces can help to strengthen your ankles. Longer Training Hikes When possible, we try to do one hike a week which is at least 10 miles. Big climbs mean great views from the top. Walking on dirt roads with the White Mountains as our backdrop. Train with what you have We have been able to tailor our training to our circumstances each year, regardless of locale and situation.

Out on a training hike with a full pack. Mileage Goals Should you have an overall mileage goal for your hiking? Beginning the AT with lots of training time under our belts helped to make it a smooth start. Questions or thoughts on this article? Please leave them below: Cancel reply. Thru Hiker Blog Well over 13, miles of our thru hiking blogs, photos of our trips and resources can all be found on this site.

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